Religious Leaders Respond to Orlando Shooting

Dr. Tarunjit Butalia, of Sikh Council of Interfaith Relations The Sikh Council of Interfaith Relations stands with religious organizations across the United States in condemning the brutal murders carried out in Orlando this weekend.  The Guru Nanak wrote “God within us renders us incapable of hate and prejudice.” It is our hope that with a united call for peace, the citizens of this country can stand together and recognize that within them all is the power to extinguish bigotry from this world.” Statement by Religions for Peace USA on Orlando, Florida Shooting On behalf of our 50 national religious member communities, Religions for Peace USA lifts up prayers and our deepest condolences to the victims of the sickening attack this morning in Orlando, Florida that left over 50 people dead and 53 injured.  We especially stand with the LGBTQ community who were the target of this vicious attack. There is no excuse for such brutality. Whenever attacks such as this are perpetrated we are confronted with a choice: to mimic the hatred we see or make a bold commitment to overcome it. The interconnected nature of our world leaves us little choice; we must all become peace-makers now. If we respond to every act of violence with a thirst for revenge, we will undoubtedly succeed in little more than inflicting unspeakable suffering on one another. Religions around the world call us to our highest and best values — those which lead us to courageous peace-making on every level.   We, therefore, urge people everywhere, to make a fresh commitment to building a world of peace and justice and doing all we can to renounce violent language and actions...
Podcast: What it Means to Stand Together

Podcast: What it Means to Stand Together

“Legitimacy can be established through credentials … or it can be established through a track record and work experience, that you have indicated through some type of continuous effort that you are someone worth listening to.” “Our bigger challenge today is … the amount of indifference that exists.  That you see injustice taking place in front of you, and you have the ability to do something about it, and you still don’t.  You can have a perspective on a person or a community that they represent, without having ever met someone from that community.” “Find the courage to go and be with those who are different rather than waiting for them to be with you.” In this episode of our free podcast series “NYC Faith Leaders,” Maggi Van Dorn interviews Imam Khalid Latif, who shares with us his experience as the first Muslim chaplain of NYU, the emerging faith leadership of young adults, and how conviction inspires and necessitates a person to work across faith lines. We’re pleased that this episode will be the first entry in the Storybank of Religions for Peace USA’s “Our Muslim Neighbor” initiative, a long-term collective impact effort geared toward combating Islamophobia with a positive, informed, and consistent message of Islam and Muslims in the U.S. We hope you will not just listen to this series, but download the podcasts to hear while driving, jogging, or washing the dishes.  And subscribe in order to be alerted when new installments are available.  It’s a great way to learn about the faiths of our New York City neighbors. What it Means to Stand Together...

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